Proposed Permanent Peace Putt Paddock


Western End, Western Park, Levin, North Island, New Zealand

Updated on Saturday 1 August 2009

The United Nations First Resolution

 

 

was on the Elimination

 

 

Of Nuclear Weapons 

 

 Click   http://www.icanw.org/1946

Article Five Of The First United Nations General Assembly Resolution Of Session One

 

 5. Terms of Reference of the Commission

The Commission shall propose with the utmost despatch and enquire into all phases of the problem, and make such recommendations from time to time with respect to them as it finds possible. In particular, the Commission shall make specific proposals

(a) for extending between all nations the exchange of basic scientific information for peaceful ends;

(b) for control of atomic energy to the extent necessary to ensure its use only for peaceful purposes

(c) for the elimination from national armaments of atomic weapons and of all other major weapons adaptable to mass destruction

(d) for effective safeguards by way of inspection and other means to protect complying States against the hazards of violation and evasions. The work of the Commission should proceed by separate stages, the successful completion of each of which will develop the necessary confidence of the world before the next stage is undertaken.

The Commission shall not infringe upon the responsibilities of any organ of the United Nations, but should present recommendations for the consideration of those organs in the performance of their tasks under the terms of the United Nations Charter.

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General Assembly resolution 1

Establishment of a Commission to deal with the problem raised by the discovery of Atomic Energy.

Resolved by the General Assembly of the United Nations to establish a Commission, with the composition and competence act our hereunder, to deal with the problems raised by the discovery of atomic energy and other related matters:

1. Establishment of a Commission

A Commission is hereby established by the General Assembly with the terms of reference set out under section 5 below.

2. Relations of the Commission with the Organs of the United Nations

(a) The Commission shall submit in reports and recommendations to the Security Council, and such reports and recommendations shall be made public unless the Security Council, in the interest of peace and security, otherwise directs. In the appropriate cases the Security Council should transmit these reports to the General Assembly and the Members of the United Nations as well as to the Economic and Social Council, and other organs within the framework of the United Nations.

(b) In view of the Security Council’s primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security, the Security Council shall issue directions to the Commission in matters affecting security. On these matters the Commission shall be accountable for its work to the Security Council.

3. Composition of the Commission

The Commission shall be composed of one representative from each of those states represented on the Security Council and Canada when that State is not a member of the Security Council. Each representative on the Commission may have such assistance as he may desire.

4. Rules of Procedure

The Commission shall have whatever staff it may deem necessary, and shall make recommendations for its rules and procedures to the Security Council, which shall approve them as a procedural matter.

5. Terms of Reference of the Commission

The Commission shall propose with the utmost despatch and enquire into all phases of the problem, and make such recommendations from time to time with respect to them as it finds possible. In particular, the Commission shall make specific proposals

(a) for extending between all nations the exchange of basic scientific information for peaceful ends;

(b) for control of atomic energy to the extent necessary to ensure its use only for peaceful purposes

(c) for the elimination from national armaments of atomic weapons and of all other major weapons adaptable to mass destruction

(d) for effective safeguards by way of inspection and other means to protect complying States against the hazards of violation and evasions. The work of the Commission should proceed by separate stages, the successful completion of each of which will develop the necessary confidence of the world before the next stage is undertaken.

The Commission shall not infringe upon the responsibilities of any organ of the United Nations, but should present recommendations for the consideration of those organs in the performance of their tasks under the terms of the United Nations Charter.

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 Click http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=31134&Cr=nuclear%20disarmament&Cr1=

 

Urging world to disarm, Ban kicks off countdown to UN Day

 

13 June 2009 – Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today launched the “WMD-WeMustDisarm” campaign, beginning the 100-day countdown to the 2009 United Nations International Day of Peace, which this year focuses on nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation.

Over the next 100 days leading up to the International Day, observed annually on 21 September, Mr. Ban and others will raise awareness of the need to eliminate nuclear weapons by issuing a daily message, via Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, email and radio, urging the world to disarm.

The Secretary-General is taking the lead by issuing the first 10 'tweets' of the campaign.

“Over the next 100 days, the United Nations and our partners around the world will work to raise awareness of the true costs and dangers of nuclear weapons,” Mr. Ban said in a message to mark the start of the countdown.

“Unless we vigorously work for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, we will continue to face threats from existing nuclear weapons, as well as additional risks that more States, even terrorists, might acquire and deploy such weapons, potentially annihilating millions of people,” he stated.

Joining him in promoting the campaign is UN Messenger of Peace and Academy Award-winning actor and producer Michael Douglas, who has championed the cause of disarmament for the UN since 1998.

Also supporting the campaign is Rainn Wilson, featured actor in the American television comedy, “The Office,” who has more than 800,000 followers on Twitter.

The International Day of Peace was established by the Assembly in 1981 as a day of global ceasefire and non-violence.

“As we observe the International Day of Peace with world leaders gathered in New York for the 64th session of the United Nations General Assembly, I will proclaim one strong, simple message: We Must Disarm!,” stated the Secretary-General.

News Tracker: past stories on this issue

 

Secretary-General sees political will for nuclear disarmament

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 Click http://www.un.org/News/Press/docs//2009/sgsm12307.doc.htm 

 12 June 2009

 

 

Secretary-General
SG/SM/12307

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

 


Secretary-General launches multimedia disarmament campaign in marking

 


100-day countdown to international day of peace


 

Following is UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s message to mark the 100-day countdown to the International Day of Peace, beginning on 13 June:  

The International Day of Peace, observed each year on 21 September, is a global call for ceasefire and non-violence.  It is a time to reflect on the horror and cost of war and the benefits of peacefully resolving our disputes.  This year, I will use this important day to ask Governments and citizens of the world to focus on the important issues of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. 

The end of the cold war helped lift the burden of nuclear catastrophe from a generation that had lived under its cloud since the end of the Second World War.  Nonetheless, the threat persists, as recent events attest.  Unless we vigorously work for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, we will continue to face threats from existing nuclear weapons, as well as additional risks that more States, even terrorists, might acquire and deploy such weapons, potentially annihilating millions of people.

This alarming outlook is counterbalanced by a new momentum on the part of world leaders to address the issue of nuclear weapons.  The United States and the Russian Federation have signalled a new commitment to cut their nuclear arsenals.  Furthermore, the Conference on Disarmament, which includes all States with nuclear arms, has recently broken a decade-long deadlock and agreed to work to resolve some of the key issues related to disarmament and non-proliferation. 

We must build on this momentum.  To that end, I am launching the WMD-WeMustDisarm! Campaign.  Over the next 100 days, the United Nations and our partners around the world will work to raise awareness of the true costs and dangers of nuclear weapons.  Between now and 21 September, we will issue 100 reasons to disarm, via Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, email, text message, radio and from friend to friend.  Celebrities will also help us spread the message.  And finally, as we observe the International Day of Peace with world leaders gathered in New York for the sixty-fourth session of the United Nations General Assembly, I will proclaim one strong, simple message:  We must disarm!


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For information media • not an official record

 

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   Click →  http://www.un.org/sg/peacedaymessage2009.shtml

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE

MESSAGE TO MARK THE 100-DAY COUNTDOWN TO THE INTERNATIONAL

 DAY OF PEACE


13 June 2009

The International Day of Peace, observed each year on 21 September, is a global call for ceasefire and non-violence. It is a time to reflect on the horror and cost of war and the benefits of peacefully resolving our disputes. This year, I will use this important day to ask governments and citizens of the world to focus on the important issues of nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation.

The end of the Cold War helped lift the burden of nuclear catastrophe from a generation that had lived under its cloud since the end of the Second World War. Nonetheless, the threat persists, as recent events attest. Unless we vigorously work for nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation, we will continue to face threats from existing nuclear weapons, as well as additional risks that more States, even terrorists, might acquire and deploy such weapons, potentially annihilating millions of people.

This alarming outlook is counterbalanced by a new momentum on the part of world leaders to address the issue of nuclear weapons. The United States and the Russian Federation have signalled a new commitment to cut their nuclear arsenals. Furthermore, the Conference on Disarmament, which includes all States with nuclear arms, has recently broken a decade-long deadlock and agreed to work to resolve some of the key issues related to disarmament and non-proliferation.

We must build on this momentum. To that end, I am launching the WMD-WeMustDisarm! Campaign. Over the next 100 days, the United Nations and our partners around the world will work to raise awareness of the true costs and dangers of nuclear weapons. Between now and 21 September, we will issue 100 reasons to disarm, via Twitter, MySpace, Facebook, email, text message, radio and from friend-to-friend. Celebrities will also help us spread the message. And finally, as we observe the International Day of Peace with world leaders gathered in New York for the 64th Session of the United Nations General Assembly, I will proclaim one strong, simple message: We Must Disarm!

Related link:

UN Disarmament Affairs

2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

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